Senator Cris Dush E-Newsletter

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In this Update:

  • May 21 “How to Shop for Energy Suppliers” Event Switched to Fully Virtual
  • PUC Alerts Consumers of June 1 Price Increases for Electric Generation
  • Dedication of the Sgt. Neil K. Dorrion Memorial Bridge in Eldred, McKean County
  • COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic Saturday, May 14 at Clinton County Community College
  • Where to Vote on May 17
  • Clearing Up Questions About Local Option Small Games of Chance Law
  • Gypsy/Spongy Moth Spraying on State Game Lands
  • Avoiding Lyme Disease in a State Where It’s Prevalent
  • May 31 SBA Disaster Loan Application Deadline Approaches for Those in Bradford, Lycoming, Potter and Tioga Counties
  • ATV Regional Trail Connector Pilot Program Opens on May 27 in Potter, Tioga, Clinton, and Lycoming Counties
  • Bicycle Rodeo in Clearfield on May 21

May 21 “How to Shop for Energy Suppliers” Event Switched to Fully Virtual

To learn more and register for this virtual education seminar go to https://bit.ly/3kY9V9q.

PUC Alerts Consumers of June 1 Price Increases for Electric Generation

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) is alerting consumers that most utilities will be adjusting their prices for electric generation on June 1. Many non-shopping (default service) customers will see sharp increases in energy costs, ranging between 6% and 45%, depending on their electric utility.

This increase is even before Gov. Tom Wolf’s carbon tax kicks in, which could nearly quadruple new electricity costs for consumers. The carbon tax is part of Pennsylvania’s entry into the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which was enacted by Gov. Wolf without legislative approval.

According to the PUC, one option consumers may want to explore immediately is their utility’s voluntary Standard Offer Program – which is another alternative for default service customers not participating in the competitive electricity market. Consumers and small businesses can also use the PUC’s PAPowerSwitch energy shopping website to explore and compare other offers from competitive energy suppliers which may provide savings compared to their utility’s default service rate.

Dedication of the Sgt. Neil K. Dorrion Memorial Bridge in Eldred, McKean County

From Left to Right: John Meyer; Taffy Meyer; McKean County Commissioner Tom Kreiner; State Sen. Cris Dush; Jim Pries; Susan Pries; State Rep. Martin Causer; Alvin Loveless, Director, McKean County Veterans affairs (back); McKean County Commissioner Carol Duffy (back); Mary Kerner; Jack Kerner

Last weekend, I had the pleasure to participate in a ceremony in Eldred, McKean County, to honor the late Neil K. Dorrion by dedicating the Route 1011 (Barnum Road) bridge over Mix Creek in Eldred Township, as the Sgt. Neil K. Dorrion Memorial Bridge.

Neil was born on March 9, 1925, in Olean, New York, but he grew up in what used to be called the Haymaker area and he attended the Eldred Township School.

During World War II, Neil answered his nation’s call, enlisting in the U.S. Army on May 14, 1943. He was later honorably discharged on Jan. 17, 1946.

Sgt. Dorrion again answered the call, voluntarily reenlisting in the Army on April 19, 1949, serving as a medic with the Medical Company, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division.

On Nov. 4, 1950, during the Battle of Kunu-ri, North Korea, Sgt. Dorrion, while tending to his wounded comrades, was killed in action.

Clearly no one was more committed to the mission than Neil, going into harm’s way in two wars, the second time to care for his fellow soldiers.

Jesus said, “Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

Neil’s love for his fellow man will be forever commemorated by the naming of the bridge, and I thank the members of his family for that love Neil exhibited to his last breath.

COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic Saturday, May 14 at Clinton County Community College

As with any medical procedure, please consult with your Primary Care physician before going for these shots.

Where to Vote on May 17

The May 17 primary election is approaching, and if you’re not sure where to vote, the polling place search tool can help.

Enter your address information in the drop-down menus and the tool will locate your polling place. It can also provide directions from your residence to the site.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day. Mail ballots must be received by your county board of elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day.

Clearing Up Questions About Local Option Small Games of Chance Law

Questions are being raised by volunteer fire companies and other clubs regarding the Local Option Small Games of Chance (SGOC) law.  Many of these groups are under the mistaken impression that a state law exists allowing clubs to conduct online fundraising during the pandemic. 

Two bills (Senate Bill 243 and House Bill 290) to authorize online SGOC and raffles during the emergency declaration and for one year afterward, or through May 1, 2022, have been introduced in both chambers of the General Assembly. While both bills have advanced through one of those chambers, they have not received final approval from both chambers.

In 2020, the General Assembly did enact Act 118, which allows SGOC licensees to forgo their annual donation requirement (SGOC law requires that licensees donate 60% of their SGOC revenue to charity, leaving them with 40% for their own operating expenses) so that, presently, clubs may use 100% of their SGOC revenue for operating expenses.

However, that authorization is set to expire on June 10, 2022. Senate Bill 1159 has been introduced to extend Act 118 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Gypsy/Spongy Moth Spraying on State Game Lands

The Pennsylvania Game Commission announced plans to spray more than 62,000 acres of state game lands this spring to protect against spongy moths, previously known by the common name gypsy moth.

The spraying is likely to occur this month on 27 different state game lands, including nearly 1,000 acres in State Game Lands (SGL) 321 in Clinton County, as well as other northcentral region game lands in Centre, Lycoming, Potter, Cameron, Elk, McKean and Tioga counties.

Most of the blocks of forest to be sprayed on game lands can be treated within one day, often within only a few hours.

The insecticide to be used is Mimic 2LV, the active ingredient of which is tebufenozide. This agent generally is considered safe to humans. As with any chemical, it may cause eye or skin irritation if exposed, and it is recommended to wash any affected area if irritation occurs.

More information on spongy moths and the Game Commission’s spraying program, including a map updating the status of this year’s spraying, is available on the commission’s interactive web page.

Avoiding Lyme Disease in a State Where It’s Prevalent

Lyme disease is a bacterial disease transmitted by the bite of a blacklegged tick or deer tick. It can cause flu-like symptoms and a rash in the early stages, but can progress to arthritic, neurologic and cardiac symptoms if it is not treated.

Pennsylvania led the nation with 6,763 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in 2019, the most recent year reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Find out how you can prevent getting Lyme disease, how to spot symptoms and more here.

May 31 SBA Disaster Loan Application Deadline Approaches for Those in Bradford, Lycoming, Potter and Tioga Counties

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is reminding businesses in Bradford, Lycoming, Potter and Tioga counties that May 31 is the application deadline for Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and private nonprofit organizations affected by flash flooding on Aug. 18, 2021. 

An EIDL can be used to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses that could have been met had the disaster not occurred. The loan amount will be based on your actual economic injury and your company’s financial needs, regardless of whether the business suffered any property damage.

For more details about the loans, see the SBA’s website.

ATV Regional Trail Connector Pilot Program Opens on May 27 in Potter, Tioga, Clinton, and Lycoming Counties

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) last week announced year two of the ATV Regional Trail Connector Pilot program in the northcentral region of the state that will provide opportunities for riding enthusiasts to traverse many miles of roads opened to all-terrain vehicle use and trails in Potter, Tioga, Clinton, and Lycoming counties.

This ATV Regional Trail Connector program is in response to growing ATV purchases, registrations, and public demand for increased riding opportunities. Through collaborations with public and private partners, the pilot aims to offer long-distance riding opportunities and contribute to local economies, while maintaining the many uses and values of the state forest system. DCNR recently revised its ATV trail policy, which lifted the moratorium on new trails that had been in place since 2003.

The goal of the pilot program is to determine whether sections of state forest roads may serve as permanent strategic connectors for regional ATV trails on a limited, case-by-case basis.

The area will open for use on May 27, 2022, and will remain open until Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022.

Bicycle Rodeo in Clearfield on May 21

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the Rotary Club of Clearfield and the Pennsylvania Traffic Injury Prevention Project will hold a bicycle rodeo on Saturday, May 21, at 3 p.m. in the CNB Bank parking lot at 31 S. 2nd Street, Clearfield, PA 16830.

Participants will be tasked with testing their cycling skills by navigating a safety skills course set up in the bank parking lot. In addition to the safety skills course, there will be free bicycle safety inspections and helmet fittings.

A limited number of free bicycle helmets, provided by the Rotary Club of Clearfield, will be available for participants who don’t have their own. Children must wear a helmet while negotiating the skills course. Additionally, Pennsylvania law requires all children younger than 12 to wear an approved bike helmet.

Children should be accompanied by a parent or adult guardian, as well as their bicycle and bicycle helmet. Parents should arrive early to complete the registration materials.

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